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Relentless ReformerJosephine Roche and Progressivism in Twentieth-Century America$
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Robyn Muncy

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691122731

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691122731.001.0001

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Childhood in the West, Education in the East, 1886–1908

Childhood in the West, Education in the East, 1886–1908

Chapter:
(p.13) Chapter 1 Childhood in the West, Education in the East, 1886–1908
Source:
Relentless Reformer
Author(s):

Robyn Muncy

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691122731.003.0002

This chapter details Josephine Roche's childhood years. Josephine Aspinwall Roche was born on December 2, 1886, in the small town of Neligh, Nebraska. Rooted in the boundary between East and West, Neligh was the perfect birthplace for a woman who would be formed equally by those two distinct regions and who would over the course of her life constantly cross boundaries, not only between East and West but also between women and men, social scientists and union organizers, workers and employers. In retrospect, her birth on a boundary seemed to mark Josephine Roche for life So did the high hopes of her parents, John J. Roche and Ella Aspinwall Roche, who migrated to Neligh after early careers in education.

Keywords:   Josephine Roche, John J. Roche, Ella Aspinwall Roche, Neligh, Nebraska, childhood, biography

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