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Muslims and Jews in FranceHistory of a Conflict$
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Maud S. Mandel

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691125817

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691125817.001.0001

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Encounters in the Metropole

Encounters in the Metropole

The Impact of Decolonization on Muslim-Jewish Life in France in the 1950s and 1960s

Chapter:
(p.59) 3 Encounters in the Metropole
Source:
Muslims and Jews in France
Author(s):

Maud S. Mandel

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691125817.003.0004

This chapter discusses how migration and settlement in Marseille in the 1950s and early 1960s illustrates the impact of colonial legacies in shaping the contours of Muslim–Jewish relations in the metropole. While Paris remained the main pole of attraction for both, Marseille's close proximity to North Africa, its Mediterranean climate, and its expanding economy meant that the city attracted thousands of repatriates and immigrants in the 1950s and 1960s. Shared cultural frameworks and the common experiences of migration and displacement meant that Muslim and Jewish newcomers often had much in common, creating the basis for convivial exchange in the mixed immigrant neighborhoods where many initially settled. Such commonalities did not, however, ensure similar processes of incorporation into French urban life. Differing relationships to the French state and levels of communal development meant that incoming Jews often not only had more resources available to them than Muslims arriving in the same period but also benefited from a local administration sympathetic to their concerns.

Keywords:   Muslims, Jews, France, integration, Muslim–Jewish relations, migration, Marseille, mixed immigrant neighborhoods, migration, displacement

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