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Family ValuesThe Ethics of Parent-Child Relationships$
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Harry Brighouse and Adam Swift

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691126913

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691126913.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.48) Introduction
Source:
Family Values
Author(s):

Harry Brighouse

Adam Swift

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691126913.003.0009

This second part of the book seeks to justify the family—to explain why it is good that children be raised by parents. It’s obviously good that they be looked after by adults, but what would be wrong with a system in which they were under the charge of different adults at different ages—specialists in dealing with young babies being replaced by experts on toddlers, who in turn would cede authority to those with advanced qualifications on the development of four-to five-year-olds, and so on? Or if continuity of care is important, would there be a problem with requiring newborn babies to be handed over to state-run child-rearing institutions staffed by well-qualified professionals? Or would it be bad if groups of twenty or thirty adults lived together in communes and shared the tasks of child rearing, with no particular child being the particular responsibility of any particular adult? In none of these alternatives would children have ...

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