Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Pollination and Floral Ecology$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Pat Willmer

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780691128610

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691128610.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 12 December 2017

Rewards and Costs: The Environmental Economics of Pollination

Rewards and Costs: The Environmental Economics of Pollination

Chapter:
(p.234) Chapter 10 Rewards and Costs: The Environmental Economics of Pollination
Source:
Pollination and Floral Ecology
Author(s):

Pat Willmer

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691128610.003.0010

This chapter examines the environmental economics of pollination, with particular emphasis on the costs that may be incurred and that have to be offset against the rewards gathered. Pollination is usually regarded as a mutualism, of benefit to both partners, each of which gains in fitness. In such a relationship, both should be trying to maximize their survival and ultimately their reproductive success, which will require balancing their costs against the rewards and hence assessing the net benefits gained. Disentangling the economic aspects of the interaction for each participant has become a major area of study in pollination ecology. The chapter first considers the conflicting requirements of a plant and its pollinators before discussing the costs incurred by the plant and the costs incurred by a flower-visiting animal. It also explores the effects of the environment on flower-pollinator interactions as economic transactions.

Keywords:   mutualism, pollination, cost, reward, pollination ecology, plant, pollinator, flower–pollinator interaction

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.