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Ecological Niches and Geographic Distributions (MPB-49)$
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A. Townsend Peterson, Jorge Soberón, Richard G. Pearson, Robert P. Anderson, Enrique Martínez-Meyer, Miguel Nakamura, and Miguel B. Araújo

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780691136868

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691136868.001.0001

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Linking Niches with Evolutionary Processes

Linking Niches with Evolutionary Processes

Chapter:
(p.238) Chapter Fifteen Linking Niches with Evolutionary Processes
Source:
Ecological Niches and Geographic Distributions (MPB-49)
Author(s):

A. Townsend Peterson

Jorge Soberón

Richard G. Pearson

Robert P. Anderson

Enrique Martínez-Meyer

Miguel Nakamura

Miguel Bastos Araújo

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691136868.003.0015

This chapter examines how the process of ecological niche evolution and diversification helps us better understand ecology, biogeography, and biodiversity. It first considers how species respond to changes in the environmental substrate on which the niches are manifested before discussing the concept of niche conservatism as well as tests of conservatism in areas such as species invasions and comparison of the ecological niche requirements of sister–species pairs. It then explores how temporal change in niche dimensions occurs, how it can be studied, and what can be learned. It also describes some of the challenges associated with applications of ecological niche modeling in the realm of evolution and concludes by outlining future directions for research.

Keywords:   ecological niche evolution, diversification, ecology, biogeography, biodiversity, species invasions, niche conservatism, ecological niche modeling, sister–species pairs

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