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Handbook of Meta-analysis in Ecology and Evolution$
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Julia Koricheva, Jessica Gurevitch, and Kerrie Mengersen

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780691137285

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691137285.001.0001

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Meta-analysis of Results from Multisite Studies

Meta-analysis of Results from Multisite Studies

Chapter:
(p.313) 19 Meta-analysis of Results from Multisite Studies
Source:
Handbook of Meta-analysis in Ecology and Evolution
Author(s):

Jessica Gurevitch

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691137285.003.0019

Research synthesis in ecology has typically been based on literature reviews, as is also common in other fields. That is, a search is conducted for relevant data addressing a particular research question, the utility of published and unpublished data is assessed, and the results are synthesized to address questions based on all of the available evidence. This chapter discusses the case of individual researchers who wish to combine the results of distinct experiments that they have conducted themselves or within a single research group, sometimes over the course of many years. Such efforts have many similarities with literature-based quantitative research synthesis, but differ in some important ways. It begins with several examples of such work, and investigates the challenges, potential pitfalls, advantages, and issues involved in using meta-analysis for the synthesis of such large-group collaborative experimental work.

Keywords:   research synthesis, collaborative research, ecology, evolutionary biology, meta-analysis

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