Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Soldier and the Changing StateBuilding Democratic Armies in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Zoltan Barany

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691137681

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691137681.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 12 December 2017

After Military Rule in Latin America: Argentina, Chile, and Guatemala

After Military Rule in Latin America: Argentina, Chile, and Guatemala

Chapter:
(p.143) Chapter 5 After Military Rule in Latin America: Argentina, Chile, and Guatemala
Source:
The Soldier and the Changing State
Author(s):

Zoltan Barany

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691137681.003.0006

This chapter describes the politics following Argentina's and Chile's last bout with authoritarianism. In spite of some important similarities between Argentina and Chile, military rule and the subsequent democratization process have been dissimilar. The chapter argues that the disparate performance of the Argentine and Chilean praetorian elites yielded for them different bargains with the opposition. These different deals led to vastly different outcomes, that is, profound disparities between military politics in contemporary Chile and Argentina. In Chile, democratizers have succeeded in gradually reducing the military's political autonomy to a level acceptable by democratic standards. On the other hand, their Argentine colleagues have gone too far in what has amounted to a virtual vendetta against the military as an institution and, in the process, seriously impaired its ability to protect and project Argentine national interests. The chapter's secondary case is Guatemala, a Central American state ruled for most of the Cold War by unusually brutal military dictators.

Keywords:   Argentina, Chile, authoritarianism, military rule, democratization, praetorian elites, military politics, political autonomy, Guatemala, military dictators

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.