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Power LinesPhoenix and the Making of the Modern Southwest$
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Andrew Needham

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691139067

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691139067.001.0001

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Integrating Geographies

Integrating Geographies

Chapter:
(p.157) Chapter 5 Integrating Geographies
Source:
Power Lines
Author(s):

Andrew Needham

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691139067.003.0006

This chapter discusses how changes in geography remade space in the Southwest, rendering the Colorado Plateau in many ways the center of the region's economic development. With the construction of Mojave Generating Station, and the expansion of Four Corners Power Plant from 230 megawatts to over 1,000 megawatts in the late 1960s, the landscape of the Colorado Plateau—and specifically the landscape of the Navajo and Hopi Nations—became the broad origin point for most of the electricity used by consumers in the Southwest. Even as this power opened up new possibilities for high-tech manufacturing industries and climate-controlled lifestyles in the region's metropolitan areas, its production increasingly structured and defined the lives of those people living on the Colorado Plateau.

Keywords:   geographic changes, Colorado Plateau, economic development, Mojave Generating Station, Four Corners Power Plant, Navajo Nations, Hopi Nations, manufacturing industries, climate-controlled lifestyles

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