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Relative JusticeCultural Diversity, Free Will, and Moral Responsibility$
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Tamler Sommers

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691139937

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691139937.001.0001

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Where Do We Go From Here?

Where Do We Go From Here?

Chapter:
(p.111) Chapter Five Where Do We Go From Here?
Source:
Relative Justice
Author(s):

Tamler Sommers

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691139937.003.0006

The first part of this book argued for metaskepticism about moral responsibility. This chapter identifies where metaskepticism fits within the philosophical landscape and outlines a framework for how we might proceed if the theory is true. First, it explores the similarities and differences between metaskepticism and other nontraditional and skeptical positions about moral responsibility, focusing especially on the fascinating work of Richard Double. It argues that although no theory can be objectively or universally true, there are principled ways in which we can approach moral responsibility within our own social, cultural, and psychological frameworks. Finally, it lays out a framework for approaching issues of moral responsibility while remaining consistent with the broader metaskeptical thesis.

Keywords:   metaskepticism, moral responsibility, Richard Double, philosophy

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