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The 1970sA New Global History from Civil Rights to Economic Inequality$
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Thomas Borstelmann

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780691141565

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691141565.001.0001

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The Retreat of Empires and the Global Advance of the Market

The Retreat of Empires and the Global Advance of the Market

Chapter:
(p.175) Chapter 4 The Retreat of Empires and the Global Advance of the Market
Source:
The 1970s
Author(s):

Thomas Borstelmann

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691141565.003.0005

This chapter places the United States in the 1970s in the context of world history. Because of the diversity of the Earth's societies in political and social development, all nations and peoples in this era did not march in lockstep with each other; as the Cold War and other conflicts revealed, trends around the globe at the time seemed to be heading in very different directions. But in retrospect, the chapter reveals the 1970s American story of moving simultaneously toward greater egalitarianism and toward greater faith in the free market fit with a similar pattern taking shape around the world, one emphasizing human rights and national self-determination, on the one hand, and the declining legitimacy of socialism and government management of economies, on the other.

Keywords:   world history, political development, social development, human rights, imperialism, national self-determination, socialism, egalitarianism, free market

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