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As If God ExistedReligion and Liberty in the History of Italy$
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Maurizio Viroli

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691142357

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691142357.001.0001

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Leaving Life

Leaving Life

Chapter:
(p.268) 25 Leaving Life
Source:
As If God Existed
Author(s):

Maurizio Viroli

, Alberto Nones
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691142357.003.0026

This chapter considers the individuals who gave their life for the religion of liberty. Umberto Ceva is one example, among many others. Born in Pavia in 1900, he was a chemist and manager. As early as 1929, he joined Giustizia e Libertà. He was arrested in 1930 together with Ernesto Rossi and Riccardo Bauer. Fearful of breaking down under torture and jeopardizing his fellows, he committed suicide in the Regina Coeli prison. Lauro de Bosis was one of the first to use the phrase “religion of liberty.” Born in Rome in 1901, de Bosis grew up in an environment rich with fervid intellectual and cultural interests. A liberal and a monarchist, de Bosis became an antifascist starting with the march on Rome. In 1924, the Italian American society of New York invited him to the United States to give history, literature, and philosophy lectures, and in 1926 he lectured at Harvard.

Keywords:   religion, liberty, Umberto Ceva, Lauro de Bosis

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