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Still a House DividedRace and Politics in Obama's America$
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Desmond S. King and Rogers M. Smith

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780691142630

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691142630.001.0001

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“We of the North were thoroughly wrong”

“We of the North were thoroughly wrong”

How Racial Alliances Mobilized Ideas and Law

Chapter:
(p.62) Chapter 3 “We of the North were thoroughly wrong”
Source:
Still a House Divided
Author(s):

Desmond S. King

Rogers M. Smith

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691142630.003.0003

This chapter talks about the complex patterns of racial alliances that emerged during the Jim Crow era. It shows that, shaped by the interactions of a wide range of groups, the patterns and practices of white supremacy during the Jim Crow years varied from state to state, town to town, even neighborhood to neighborhood, and shifted over time in differing ways in all these locales. Within this new era of American racial politics, diminished but determined racially egalitarian actors, groups, and institutions remained important players in American politics, and over time new ones emerged. From their own efforts, aided by changes in a range of domestic and international circumstances, they would gradually grow more powerful through the first two-thirds of the twentieth century, especially during and after World War II.

Keywords:   Jim Crow, NAACP, anti-Jim Crow alliances, pro-Jim Crow alliances, racial alliances, segregation, African American reform, modern racial alliances

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