Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Power to the PeopleEnergy in Europe over the Last Five Centuries$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Astrid Kander, Paolo Malanima, and Paul Warde

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691143620

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691143620.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 17 December 2017

Major Development Blocks in the Twentieth Century and Their Impacts on Energy

Major Development Blocks in the Twentieth Century and Their Impacts on Energy

Chapter:
(p.287) Chapter Nine Major Development Blocks in the Twentieth Century and Their Impacts on Energy
Source:
Power to the People
Author(s):

Malanima Paolo

Astrid Kander

Paul Warde

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691143620.003.0009

This chapter examines the impact of major development blocks on the diffusion of new energy carriers and energy consumption in twentieth-century Europe. The focus is on the drivers of energy transitions and economic energy efficiency. The second and third industrial revolutions were each distinguished by major development blocks in the fields of energy and communication. In the second industrial revolution, starting around 1870, there were two main development blocks: one centered on the internal combustion engine and oil use (the ICE-Oil block) and another one centered on electricity (the Electricity block). In the third industrial revolution, which took off from the mid-1970s, the development block around information and communication technology (the ICT block) becomes dominant, with the transistor as its macro-innovation. The chapter discusses the functioning of the core macro-innovation of each development block as well as its diffusion in society using the concepts of market suction and market widening.

Keywords:   development blocks, energy consumption, Europe, internal combustion engine, oil, electricity, information technology, macro-innovation, market suction, market widening

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.