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Truth$
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Alexis G. Burgess and John P. Burgess

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780691144016

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691144016.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Chapter One Introduction
Source:
Truth
Author(s):

Alexis G. Burgess

John P. Burgess

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691144016.003.0001

This book examines recent philosophical inquiries into what it is for a thing to be true. Probably the best-known saying about truth by a philosopher is Aristotle's assertion: “To say of what is that it is not, or of what is not that it is, is false, while to say of what is that it is, and of what is not that it is not, is true.” The book gives a nontechnical account of the most often discussed aspects of Alfred Tarski's views and considers the debates regarding deflationism, realism, and antirealism. It also explores views on liar-style paradoxes, with an account of the work of Saul Kripke, along with arguments advocating deviation from classical logic and arguments emphasizing the role of context in communication. Finally, it analyzes the connection between the issue of the solvability or unsolvability of the paradoxes and the issues between deflationism and inflationism.

Keywords:   truth, Aristotle, Alfred Tarski, deflationism, realism, antirealism, Saul Kripke, paradoxes, communication, inflationism

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