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The Emancipation of Europe's MuslimsThe State's Role in Minority Integration$
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Jonathan Laurence

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691144214

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691144214.001.0001

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Citizens, Groups, and the State

Citizens, Groups, and the State

Chapter:
(p.105) Chapter Four Citizens, Groups, and the State
Source:
The Emancipation of Europe's Muslims
Author(s):

Jonathan Laurence

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691144214.003.0004

This chapter places European governments' relationships with contemporary Muslim communities into historical and theoretical context, by reviewing earlier encounters with new categories of citizens and state-building challenges. For the past two centuries, the religion bureaus of interior ministries across Europe have asserted state authority by structuring and mediating the activities of religious organizations. Against the view that the accommodation of religious communities is the equivalent of “capitulation,” this chapter shows that formal recognition has been the method through which the modern state has historically asserted its authority over new citizen groups. The view that Islam is inherently incompatible with, or otherwise presents an unprecedented challenge to, state authority in western democracies is critically examined.

Keywords:   European governments, Muslim communities, state-building challenges, religious organizations, religious communities, new citizen groups, state authority, western democracies

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