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Free Market Fairness$
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John Tomasi

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691144467

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691144467.001.0001

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Two Concepts of Fairness

Two Concepts of Fairness

Chapter:
(p.162) Chapter 6 Two Concepts of Fairness
Source:
Free Market Fairness
Author(s):

John Tomasi

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691144467.003.0006

This chapter considers two concepts of fairness, starting the discussion by focusing on market democracy's thick conception of economic freedom in relation to social justice. Market democracy breaks with traditional classical liberal and libertarian traditions in founding politics on a deliberative ideal of democratic citizenship, even as it makes room for a variety of rival conceptions of the nature of public reason. The chapter offers a market democratic interpretation of John Rawls' notion of justice as fairness. It also examines what free market fairness says about a society in which citizens are experiencing the blessings of liberal justice, along with its alternative perspective to social democracy's emphasis on instilling in the citizenry a sense of democratic solidarity. Finally, it compares the interpretations of social democracy and free market fairness regarding justice as fairness and the difference principle, respectively.

Keywords:   market democracy, economic freedom, social justice, democratic citizenship, John Rawls, free market fairness, liberal justice, social democracy, difference principle

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