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Attention Deficit DemocracyThe Paradox of Civic Engagement$
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Ben Berger

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780691144689

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691144689.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Tocqueville vs. The Full Monty

Chapter:
(p.144) Chapter 6 Conclusion
Source:
Attention Deficit Democracy
Author(s):

Ben Berger

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691144689.003.0006

This book has argued that civic engagement is a hopelessly confusing term and therefore should give way to political, social, and moral engagement. It has also critiqued idealistic conceptions of participatory democracy for aiming for the Full Monty: high and widespread political engagement among all citizens, all (or much) of the time, in spite of citizens' long-standing inclinations toward the opposite. Some idealistic theories of democracy, the Full Monty versions, have asked too much of citizens' tastes, attention, and energy. This concluding chapter proposes three approaches to improving democracy that conform to Alexis de Tocqueville's premises and insights: changing our approach to politics and political mobilization, changing ourselves, and changing our institutions.

Keywords:   civic engagement, political engagement, social engagement, moral engagement, participatory democracy, politics, Alexis de Tocqueville, political mobilization

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