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The Makings of Indonesian IslamOrientalism and the Narration of a Sufi Past$
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Michael Laffan

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780691145303

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691145303.001.0001

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New Regimes of Knowledge, 1800–1865

New Regimes of Knowledge, 1800–1865

Chapter:
(p.85) Chapter Five New Regimes of Knowledge, 1800–1865
Source:
The Makings of Indonesian Islam
Author(s):

Michael Laffan

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691145303.003.0005

This chapter explores the changes wrought in the nineteenth century under the impact of new cultures of science and new concepts of empire fostered by the governments of The Hague and Batavia. These intellectual developments resulted in a more active attempt by the Westerners to measure and understand how Islam was organized in the archipelago and to educate their officials in Islamic Law in preparation for their deployment in the field. Efforts to provide colonial officials with a working knowledge of local languages and cultures proceeded by fits and starts and really began in earnest only after the British interregnum of 1811–16. For much of the nineteenth century, Dutch scholarship followed the British lead. Once the Dutch returned to power, they made a fresh effort to collect information about indigenous education with an eye to substituting something of their own devising.

Keywords:   The Hague, Batavia, Islam, Islamic Law, local languages, local cultures, British interregnum, Dutch scholarship, indigenous education

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