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The Makings of Indonesian IslamOrientalism and the Narration of a Sufi Past$
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Michael Laffan

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780691145303

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691145303.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.233) Conclusion
Source:
The Makings of Indonesian Islam
Author(s):

Michael Laffan

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691145303.003.0013

This concluding chapter recounts the overall arc of this book to show how colonial scholarship interpreted the precolonial, and then inflected particular strands of reformist Sufi self-critique into modernist discourse. The introduction of formalized techniques of Sufi learning was often tied to scholarly intolerance of popular variance that perhaps began as emulation of regal prerogatives. By the eighteenth century, increasingly intense connections between Asian courts and Middle Eastern centers of learning engendered appeals to the principle that normative legal practices should define the standard of Islam for most believers. Such appeals were accompanied by the embrace or rejection of foreigners and attempts to restrict Sufi knowledge to a learned elite who could sit in judgement over them.

Keywords:   colonial scholarship, Sufism, Sufi learning, Asian courts, Middle Eastern learning, legal practices, Islam, Sufi knowledge

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