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Creating the Market UniversityHow Academic Science Became an Economic Engine$
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Elizabeth Popp Berman

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691147086

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691147086.001.0001

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The Spread of Market Logic

The Spread of Market Logic

Chapter:
(p.146) Chapter 7 The Spread of Market Logic
Source:
Creating the Market University
Author(s):

Elizabeth Popp Berman

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691147086.003.0007

The preceding three chapters showed how changes in the policy environment, driven by a newfound political concern with innovation, allowed specific market-oriented practices to grow and spread across universities in the late 1970s and early 1980s. This chapter examines how the market logic embodied in those practices became increasingly influential throughout academic science during the 1980s. The success of biotech entrepreneurship, university patenting, and university-industry research centers encouraged additional experiments with and expansions of market-logic activity, only some of which were successful. The 1980s also saw a new wave of expansion of older market-oriented activities, like research parks, that had stagnated during the 1970s.

Keywords:   innovation, market logic, academic science, biotech entrepreneurship, patenting, university–industry research centers

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