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Dead RingersHow Outsourcing Is Changing the Way Indians Understand Themselves$
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Shehzad Nadeem

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780691147871

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691147871.001.0001

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The Infantilizing Gaze, or Schmidt Revisited

The Infantilizing Gaze, or Schmidt Revisited

Chapter:
(p.132) Chapter Six. The Infantilizing Gaze, or Schmidt Revisited
Source:
Dead Ringers
Author(s):

Shehzad Nadeem

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691147871.003.0007

This chapter examines the globalization of corporate culture. It first considers the balance of control and consent in the workplace before discussing managerial views of Indian workers. It then explores how professionalism plays itself out in the lives of outsourcing workers and describes some of the less than salutary effects of this push for moral reform. It also analyzes the ways that rule-bending undermines the meritocratic aspirations of the contemporary workplace. The chapter shows that management's infantilizing gaze, its project of moral reform, and the “flexible” labor regime are mutually supportive. Frustrated by what they perceive to be the submissiveness and excessive “Indianness” of their employees, management attempts to instill nominally Western professional values in the workforce.

Keywords:   globalization, corporate culture, control, consent, workplace, Indian workers, professionalism, outsourcing, management, moral reform

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