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The Making of Modern Liberalism$
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Alan Ryan

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691148403

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691148403.001.0001

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Hegel on Work, Ownership, and Citizenship

Hegel on Work, Ownership, and Citizenship

Chapter:
(p.538) 28 Hegel on Work, Ownership, and Citizenship
Source:
The Making of Modern Liberalism
Author(s):

Alan Ryan

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691148403.003.0029

This chapter examines how G.W.F. Hegel combats both a utilitarian and a strictly Kantian account of the connections between work, ownership, and citizenship, with the ultimate aim of showing how various tensions that commonly beset theories of property bedevil his own account. Hegel certainly saw the importance of the distinction between owning one's job and having security of tenure during good behavior. Indeed, he argued that the transition from medieval to modern constitutional arrangements necessarily brought with it a transition from private ownership of public positions to crown appointment on the basis of qualifications and performance. The chapter first provides an overview of the intellectual context of Hegel's exposition, with emphasis on themes associated with John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, and David Hume. It then considers Hegel's views on topics such as agriculture, civil society, family, and freedom.

Keywords:   work, G.W.F. Hegel, ownership, citizenship, property, Immanuel Kant, agriculture, civil society, family, freedom

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