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Against MassacreHumanitarian Interventions in the Ottoman Empire, 1815-1914$
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Davide Rodogno

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780691151335

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691151335.001.0001

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Exclusion of the Ottoman Empire from the Family of Nations, and Legal Doctrines of Humanitarian Intervention

Exclusion of the Ottoman Empire from the Family of Nations, and Legal Doctrines of Humanitarian Intervention

Chapter:
(p.36) Chapter Two Exclusion of the Ottoman Empire from the Family of Nations, and Legal Doctrines of Humanitarian Intervention
Source:
Against Massacre
Author(s):

Davide Rodogno

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691151335.003.0003

This chapter examines the legal doctrines of humanitarian intervention that were developed in the second half of the nineteenth century. Drawing on nineteenth-century British and French writings, articles, memoirs, journals, pamphlets, and reviews, it shows that the image of the Ottoman Empire and that of its Christian subjects were far from being monolithic. The chapter first considers the reasons why the Ottoman Empire was generally excluded from the Family of Nations, including despotism, Islam, polygamy, slavery, corruption and the absence of a sound social structure, inability to reciprocate in legal dealings, and unwillingness or incapacity to institute reforms that would guarantee security of life and property to Ottoman Christians. It then discusses the main criterion articulated by various legal scholars for the Ottoman Empire's inclusion in the Family of Nations before concluding with an analysis of late-nineteenth-century doctrines of humanitarian intervention.

Keywords:   legal doctrine, humanitarian intervention, Ottoman Empire, Family of Nations, despotism, Islam, polygamy, slavery, corruption, Ottoman Christians

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