Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Enigmas of Identity$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Peter Brooks

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780691151588

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691151588.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 June 2018

The Derealization of Self

The Derealization of Self

Chapter:
6 The Derealization of Self
Source:
Enigmas of Identity
Author(s):

Peter Brooks

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691151588.003.0007

This chapter discusses the importance of the place of the knower in relation to the known, the narrating I to the narrated I, when they are one and “the same” person—whatever that oneness and sameness may mean, which in fact turns out to be problematic. The strange workings of derealization are potentially helpful in understanding some of the writers who undertake to explore the enigma of identity in its peculiarly modern forms. Such writers include Jean-Jacques Rousseau, William Wordsworth, Marcel Proust, Virginia Woolf, Robert Musil, Italo Svevo, and Sigmund Freud. These writers all tend to come upon moments at which introspection, or inquest into the formation of the self, encounters a dissolution or estrangement of self that is somehow key to its understanding.

Keywords:   derealization, identity, introspection, self, self dissolution, self estrangement

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.