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Presidents and the Dissolution of the UnionLeadership Style from Polk to Lincoln$
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Fred I. Greenstein

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780691151991

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691151991.001.0001

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Abraham Lincoln: Consummate Leader

Abraham Lincoln: Consummate Leader

(p.93) Chapter 7 Abraham Lincoln: Consummate Leader
Presidents and the Dissolution of the Union

Fred I. Greenstein

Dale Anderson

Princeton University Press

This chapter assesses the strengths and weaknesses of Abraham Lincoln, focusing on six realms: public communication, organizational capacity, political skill, policy vision, cognitive style, and emotional intelligence. Lincoln entered the White House following a mere eight years as a state legislator and two years in the House of Representatives. He excelled in all of the qualities used here to assess leadership. In the realm of communication, he showed acumen in the way he managed his message, the vision conveyed in his statements, and the clarity of his rhetoric. His organizational methods were unsystematic but effective, and were driven by his political acumen. Lincoln was also a master politician who could cooperate with others regardless of their viewpoints.

Keywords:   American Civil War, American presidents, Abraham Lincoln, public communication, organizational capacity, political skill, policy vision, cognitive style, emotional intelligence

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