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TocquevilleThe Aristocratic Sources of Liberty$
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Lucien Jaume

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780691152042

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691152042.001.0001

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Tocqueville and Guizot

Tocqueville and Guizot

Two Conceptions of Authority

(p.251) 12 Tocqueville and Guizot

Lucien Jaume

, Arthur Goldhammer
Princeton University Press

This chapter presents a comparison of the thoughts of Tocqueville and Guizot. Both men represent the same important historical and intellectual moment and both are indispensable for understanding the French spirit. To be sure, they did not belong to the same generation: nearly twenty years separate the two men. Yet they continually observed each other, encountered each other in public life, and disappointed each other repeatedly. The fundamental divergence between them involved an issue that was central to Tocqueville's thinking and one of the major questions of the day: What type of authority was possible in the society to which Guizot often referred as “the new France”? Guizot was a proponent of elitist government and Tocqueville of subdued popular sovereignty.

Keywords:   Alexis de Tocqueville, François Guizot, authority, France, elite government, popular sovereignty

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