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Philosophic PrideStoicism and Political Thought from Lipsius to Rousseau$
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Christopher Brooke

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691152080

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691152080.001.0001

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Augustine of Hippo

Augustine of Hippo

Chapter:
(p.1) Prologue Augustine of Hippo
Source:
Philosophic Pride
Author(s):

Christopher Brooke

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691152080.003.0001

This introductory chapter analyses the fourteenth book of The City of God against the Pagans (c. fifth century CE) by Augustine of Hippo. Book 14 contains the analysis of Adam and Eve's life in the Garden of Eden and their subsequent Fall. This is an episode central not only to his theological project, in that Augustine single-handedly created the doctrine of original sin that dominated the thinking of the Church for so long, but also to his political theory, because it provides the setting for the central categories of the work's overall argument. More importantly, the chapters in book 14 contain by far the most sustained rumination on Stoic philosophy to be found in the entire work.

Keywords:   Augustine of Hippo, Stoic philosophy, Adam and Eve, City of God, Stoic ethics, passionlessness, apatheia, Christianity, philosophical critique

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