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The Importance of Being CivilThe Struggle for Political Decency$
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John A. Hall

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780691153261

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691153261.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.247) Conclusion
Source:
The Importance of Being Civil
Author(s):

John A. Hall

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691153261.003.0012

This concluding chapter argues that anxiety and even hostility have been shown to be the actions of states; when they put ideological dreams into effect, they become enemies of civility, and all too often politicize social actors so as to make them recalcitrant. Virtue should not be the business of states, and visions should remain private. This is not to say for a moment that states are not needed. Civil behavior by political elites can lead to the creation and maintenance of an inclusive and open frame within which people, blessed with negative resisting power, can experiment with their lives. The chapter then addresses the problem of economic growth—that is, the creation of decent sufficiencies and negative resisting power.

Keywords:   civility, social actors, virtue, visions, civil behavior, political elites, negative resisting power, economic growth, sufficiencies

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