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The Irresistible Fairy TaleThe Cultural and Social History of a Genre$
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Jack Zipes

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691153384

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691153384.001.0001

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The Tales of Innocent Persecuted Heroines and Their Neglected Female Storytellers and Collectors

The Tales of Innocent Persecuted Heroines and Their Neglected Female Storytellers and Collectors

Chapter:
(p.80) 5 The Tales of Innocent Persecuted Heroines and Their Neglected Female Storytellers and Collectors
Source:
The Irresistible Fairy Tale
Author(s):

Jack Zipes

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691153384.003.0005

This chapter deals with a significant, but obfuscated category of nineteenth-century folk and fairy tales that deserves greater attention: tales told, collected, and written by women. Hardly anyoneknows anything about the tales of Laura Gonzenbach, Božena Němcová, Nannette Lévesque, and Rachel Busk, despite the great advances made in feminist studies that led to the rediscovery of important women European writers of fairy tales from the seventeenth century to the present. Not only are the tales by Gonzenbach, Němcová, Lévesque, and Busk pertinent for what they reveal about the beliefs and customs of specific communities in the nineteenth century and about the role of women, but they are also valuable in the study of folklore for elucidating the problematic aspects of orality and literacy, and the interpretation of particular tale types such as the innocent persecuted heroine.

Keywords:   fairy tales, folk tales, Laura Gonzenbach, Božena Němcová, Nannette Lévesque, Rachel Busk, women writers, orality, literacy

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