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The Sun's Influence on Climate$
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Joanna D. Haigh and Peter Cargill

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780691153834

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691153834.001.0001

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Chapter:
(p.166) 9 Summary
Source:
The Sun's Influence on Climate
Author(s):

Joanna D. Haigh

Peter Cargill

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691153834.003.0009

This concluding chapter talks about how the Earth's climate is fundamental to the well-being of humanity, and any factor with the potential to affect that is obviously of concern. Thus, an understandable interest in the body that provides the energy for all life on Earth has driven a long history of study of how changes in the Sun might influence the climate. The wealth of physical, chemical, and biological processes involved also makes the topic of intrinsic scientific fascination. Observations of the Sun, alongside theoretical advances and developments in models, are helping to further understanding of its behavior. In particular, significant advances have been made in determining how different activity indicators relate to the physical processes involved in the evolution of the solar magnetic field, sunspots, and radiation over the 11-year cycle.

Keywords:   Earth, Sun, climate, physical processes, chemical processes, biological processes, solar magnetic field, sunspots, radiation

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