Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Second Red Scare and the Unmaking of the New Deal Left$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Landon R. Y. Storrs

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691153964

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691153964.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 22 October 2018

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.259) Conclusion
Source:
The Second Red Scare and the Unmaking of the New Deal Left
Author(s):

Landon R. Y. Storrs

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691153964.003.0009

This concluding chapter argues that the civil servants described here saw themselves as defenders, not betrayers, of fundamental American values such as egalitarianism and democracy. Not only does acknowledging their presence in the Roosevelt and Truman administrations yield a more accurate history, but a broader understanding of how the right misrepresented and curtailed their influence may contribute to a more informed political discourse. Indeed, correcting the historical record seems especially important now, in the early twenty-first century, when conservatives have returned to arguing that goals such as a more equitable distribution of wealth are alien to the American tradition and to demonizing any deviation from free-market economic policy as socialistic.

Keywords:   civil servants, American values, egalitarianism, democracy, political discourse, conservatives, socialism, free-market economic policy, Roosevelt Administration, Truman Administration

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.