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When Is True Belief Knowledge?$
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Richard Foley

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691154725

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691154725.001.0001

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The Theory of Knowledge and Theory of Justified Belief

The Theory of Knowledge and Theory of Justified Belief

Chapter:
(p.51) Chapter 9 The Theory of Knowledge and Theory of Justified Belief
Source:
When Is True Belief Knowledge?
Author(s):

Richard Foley

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691154725.003.0009

This chapter returns to Gettier's article, “Is Justified True Belief Knowledge?” and considers its impact on the theory of knowledge and the theory of justified belief. It first discusses the internalist and externalist accounts on true belief proposed by many epistemologists in response to Gettier's article. The chapter then turns to the working strategy that has dominated epistemology since Gettier's article—the employment of the assumption that knowledge and justification are conceptually connected to draw strong, and sometimes antecedently implausible, conclusions about knowledge or justification. The strategy can be thought of as an epistemology game—a “Gettier game”—and the chapter concludes by offering solutions to it.

Keywords:   theory of knowledge, theory of justified belief, Edmund Gettier, epistemology, justifications, Gettier game

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