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The New Terrain of International LawCourts, Politics, Rights$
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Karen J. Alter

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691154749

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691154749.001.0001

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International Law Enforcement

International Law Enforcement

Chapter:
(p.244) Chapter 7 International Law Enforcement
Source:
The New Terrain of International Law
Author(s):

Karen J. Alter

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691154749.003.0007

This chapter presents four case studies covering all of the substantive domains in which international courts operate. The case studies show World Trade Organization (WTO) litigation pressuring the US Congress to change a tax policy that promoted US exports; the Andean Tribunal facilitating a retreat on the issuing of “second use patents”; and the Community Court of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) leading Niger to compensate Hadijatou Mani for enslavement in the customary family law system, as well as the indictment and arrest of Charles Taylor for crimes committed in a neighboring country. In all of these case studies, the ability of ICs to offer a remedy mobilized litigants, and ICs' rulings constructed focal remedies that compliance supporters could demand.

Keywords:   international courts, WTO, US Congress, Andean Tribunal, ECOWAS, Niger, litigants, compliance

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