Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Nasser's GambleHow Intervention in Yemen Caused the Six-Day War and the Decline of Egyptian Power$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jesse Ferris

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691155142

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691155142.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 19 January 2018

Guns for Cotton

Guns for Cotton

The Unraveling of Soviet-Egyptian Relations, 1964–66

Chapter:
(p.142) Chapter Four Guns for Cotton
Source:
Nasser's Gamble
Author(s):

Jesse Ferris

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691155142.003.0005

This chapter examines Egypt's growing dependence on the Soviet Union as a result of the war in Yemen. It explores the tensions that developed between the two countries after Khrushchev's ouster as the Soviet government began to exploit Egypt's difficulties in order to obtain basing rights that would even the playing field against the US Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean. The uneasy dependency on Moscow, in conjunction with the rupture in relations with Washington, shattered the edifice of Egyptian neutrality, which stood at the foundation of Nasser's international clout in the 1950s, and set the stage for the crisis that produced the Six-Day War.

Keywords:   Egypt, Soviet Union, Yemen, Khrushchev, US Sixth Fleet, Egyptian neutrality, Six-Day War

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.