Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Nasser's GambleHow Intervention in Yemen Caused the Six-Day War and the Decline of Egyptian Power$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jesse Ferris

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691155142

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691155142.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 October 2018

The Twilight of Egyptian Power

The Twilight of Egyptian Power

Chapter:
(p.295) Afterword The Twilight of Egyptian Power
Source:
Nasser's Gamble
Author(s):

Jesse Ferris

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691155142.003.0009

This concluding chapter talks about how Nasser's greatest failing may well have been his failure to open up space for political participation. It was not just a question of creating a popular base for his rule (as Nasser repeatedly sought to do, from the Liberation Rally to the Arab Socialist Union), but of enabling genuinely participatory politics that would ensure the future of the regime and guide Egypt forward once the great leader left the stage. If Nasser survived Egypt's humiliating defeat in 1967, there is little reason to doubt he would have survived the inauguration of a phase of moderation following the perceived triumph of 1956. The pursuit of such an inward-focused policy would have meant that the legitimacy of the regime came to rest on domestic performance, not foreign pyrotechnics.

Keywords:   Nasser, political participation, Liberation Rally, Arab Socialist Union, Egypt, inward-focused policy, domestic performance

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.