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The Empire TrapThe Rise and Fall of U.S. Intervention to Protect American Property Overseas, 1893-2013$
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Noel Maurer

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780691155821

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691155821.001.0001

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Avoiding the Trap

Avoiding the Trap

Chapter:
(p.25) Two Avoiding the Trap
Source:
The Empire Trap
Author(s):

Noel Maurer

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691155821.003.0002

This chapter examines how the Democratic opponents of imperial expansion prevented the emergence of an empire trap in the Philippines and occupied Cuba. The McKinley administration annexed the Philippines for strategic reasons, but anti-imperialists used their blocking power in the Senate to restrict American investment in the islands deliberately, in order to prevent the emergence of a domestic interest group favoring the islands' retention as U.S. territory. Similar laws were passed for Cuba as long as a U.S. occupation government remained. The anti-imperialists failed to grant the Philippines immediate independence, but they did succeed in retarding U.S. investment. As a result, no “Philippine lobby” ever emerged to support the permanent retention of the archipelago.

Keywords:   imperial expansion, Democrats, empire trap, Philippines, Cuba, McKinley administration, U.S. territory, anti-imperialists

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