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Local Histories/Global DesignsColoniality, Subaltern Knowledges, and Border Thinking$
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Walter D. Mignolo

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780691156095

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691156095.001.0001

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Are Subaltern Studies Postmodern or Postcolonial? The Politics and Sensibilities of Geohistorical Locations

Are Subaltern Studies Postmodern or Postcolonial? The Politics and Sensibilities of Geohistorical Locations

Chapter:
(p.173) Chapter 4 Are Subaltern Studies Postmodern or Postcolonial? The Politics and Sensibilities of Geohistorical Locations
Source:
Local Histories/Global Designs
Author(s):

Walter D. Mignolo

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691156095.003.0005

This chapter discusses South Asian subaltern studies as well as their adaptation by Latin Americanist historian Florencia Mallon and by the Latin American Subaltern Studies Group. It is important to keep in mind the differences between the original projects of South Asian Subaltern Studies Group formulated in terms of querying the “historic failure of the nation to come to its own” and of making clear that, “it is the study of this failure which constitutes the central problematic of the historiography of colonial India.” Although one can say that it is this problematic that engages Mallon's and the Latin American Group's adaptation, in both cases, there is a lack of attention to the fact that Latin America is not a country—like postpartition India—and that the many countries of Latin America obtained their independence at the beginning of the nineteenth century and not in 1947.

Keywords:   South Asian subaltern studies, Florencia Mallon, Latin American Subaltern Studies Group, colonial India, postpartition India, geohistorical locations

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