Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Death to Tyrants!Ancient Greek Democracy and the Struggle against Tyranny$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

David A. Teegarden

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780691156903

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691156903.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 July 2018

The Decree of Demophantos

The Decree of Demophantos

Chapter:
(p.15) 1 The Decree of Demophantos
Source:
Death to Tyrants!
Author(s):

David A. Teegarden

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691156903.003.0002

This chapter accounts for the successful mobilization in defense of Athens' democracy. It begins by exploring the collective response by citizens in Athens to the coup of the Four Hundred (411), an experience that taught the Athenians important lessons about mobilization in defense of their democracy. Two significant points emerge from that discussion. First, individuals in Athens did not respond to the coup initially because they had a so-called “revolutionary coordination problem”: many wanted to oppose the coup, but, because of the great risk that that involved, each individual waited for others to act before he did. Second, the conspicuous assassination of Phrynichos, a prominent figure in the regime of the Four Hundred, set in motion a “revolutionary bandwagon” that enabled previously quiescent individuals to mobilize en masse against the regime of the Four Hundred. The chapter then examines the consequence of the fact that all Athenians swore the oath of Demophantos. The final section demonstrates that the successful mobilization against the Thirty Tyrants should be attributed, in part, to the fact that all Athenians swore the oath of Demophantos.

Keywords:   Athens, democracy, Four Hundred, oath of Demophantos, Thirty Tyrants

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.