Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Cultural ExchangeJews, Christians, and Art in the Medieval Marketplace$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Joseph Shatzmiller

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780691156996

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691156996.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM PRINCETON SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.princeton.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Princeton University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 19 April 2018

German Jews and Figurative Art

German Jews and Figurative Art

Appreciation and Reservation

Chapter:
(p.73) Chapter Five German Jews and Figurative Art
Source:
Cultural Exchange
Author(s):

Joseph Shatzmiller

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691156996.003.0006

This chapter briefly reviews the art history from 1230–1450 CE in order to better understand the cultural profile of the rabbi, and to evaluate the contribution of the wall paintings in his house as indications of the artistic horizons of German Jews of the fourteenth century. It also shows how Jews had to abandon the art that they cherished for generations, yet they found ways to keep alive their fascination with the beautiful and to nurse their aesthetic needs. The interior synagogue of Santa Maria la Blanca of Toledo and that of the recently reconstructed Sinagoga Mayor of Segovia manifest a profound attachment to Islamic public architecture. Jews showed great appreciation for the decorative value of their Hebrew alphabet. They also learned to paint inanimate or geometric images in miniature letters on the covers of their Bibles.

Keywords:   German Jews, art history, aesthetic needs, Santa Maria la Blanca of Toledo, Sinagoga Mayor of Segovia, Hebrew alphabet, Islamic public architecture

Princeton Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.