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Cultural ExchangeJews, Christians, and Art in the Medieval Marketplace$
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Joseph Shatzmiller

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780691156996

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691156996.001.0001

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Conclusions

Conclusions

Chapter:
(p.158) Conclusions
Source:
Cultural Exchange
Author(s):

Joseph Shatzmiller

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691156996.003.0009

This concluding chapter explains how it was no surprise that Christian artisans did not shy away from decorating Jewish objects for devotional purposes. When exceptional situations like the movement of the artisans' services back and forth are observed, instances of peaceful exchange and probably even friendly coexistence, even if ephemeral, do emerge. Such “moments of grace” did not occur only among members of the artistic community. While a mass of documentation records the hostility and violence that marked Christian–Jewish relationships during these centuries, instances of tolerance surface in the documents as well, if only occasionally. The chapter contends that in the future, more rich archives are sure to reveal information about cordial Jewish relationships between Jews and Christians in past centuries.

Keywords:   Christian artisans, Jewish objects, devotional purposes, peaceful exchange, Christian–Jewish relations

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