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The Devil's TabernacleThe Pagan Oracles in Early Modern Thought$
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Anthony Ossa-Richardson

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780691157115

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691157115.001.0001

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Les Lauriers sont coupés

Les Lauriers sont coupés

Chapter:
(p.285) Conclusion Les Lauriers sont coupés
Source:
The Devil's Tabernacle
Author(s):

Anthony Ossa-Richardson

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691157115.003.0008

This chapter focuses on Delphi, arguing that it has fallen out of our world. Since it yielded to the archaeologists, and to the tourists, it has become ashrine only to curiosity, to be approached with a disinterested wonder. In opening our minds to its mysteries, and to the beauty of its setting, we have rendered the oracle unable to tell us about ourselves. The fictions and half-fictions spun of the oracles since Petrarch and Ciriaco have both echoed and shaped our views of our own culture and history. Early modern constructions of Delphi, and of pagan religion, were, at the last count, constructions of self, even as that self changed. The oracles could have no higher calling.

Keywords:   oracles, Delphi, pagan antiquity, pagan religion

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