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Don't Blame UsSuburban Liberals and the Transformation of the Democratic Party$
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Lily Geismer

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691157238

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691157238.001.0001

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Grappling with Growth

Grappling with Growth

Chapter:
(p.97) 4 Grappling with Growth
Source:
Don't Blame Us
Author(s):

Lily Geismer

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691157238.003.0005

This chapter looks at how the issues of open space and environmental protection revealed the tension between the structural processes of growth that had produced Route 128 and its suburbs and the ideology of historical and liberal distinctiveness of many of the residents along its ring. The area was considered “unique and special”—an outlook which propelled a genuine concern about the environmental degradation advanced by postwar suburbanization. Yet the localist measures that residents took to protect their communities elevated both a sense of their own distinctiveness and a focus on their own individual standard of living and quality of life, further obscuring an acknowledgment of their role in perpetuating many of the problems of environmental and social inequality.

Keywords:   open space, environmental protection, environmentalism, social inequality, environmental degradation, postwar suburbanization, localism, exclusivity, environmental inequality

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