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SecurityPolitics, Humanity, and the Philology of Care$
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John T. Hamilton

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780691157528

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691157528.001.0001

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The Pasture and the Garden

The Pasture and the Garden

Chapter:
(p.68) 5 The Pasture and the Garden
Source:
Security
Author(s):

John T. Hamilton

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691157528.003.0005

This chapter returns to the Hyginus fable with which this study began in order to specify further the semantic ramifications of Latin cura, and hence securitas. The Hyginus fable insists that care should possess mankind—Cura eum possideat—which is to say that, if ever removed from care, humanity would be robbed of its humanity. Interestingly, the similar story of mankind's formation in the book of Genesis takes place in a garden, which would normally be a place requiring careful attention. The gardener is, indeed, the paradigmatic caretaker. Yet, in the Hebrew account, the first humans inhabit a garden where everything is already provided. This carefree existence may account for other reversals that the biblical story reveals in comparison with the Roman fable.

Keywords:   security, Hyginus, cura, securitas, care, fables, Genesis, humanity

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