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Rethinking Private AuthorityAgents and Entrepreneurs in Global Environmental Governance$
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Jessica F. Green

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780691157580

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691157580.001.0001

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Agents of the State: A Century of Delegation in International Environmental Law

Agents of the State: A Century of Delegation in International Environmental Law

Chapter:
(p.54) Chapter Two Agents of the State: A Century of Delegation in International Environmental Law
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Rethinking Private Authority
Author(s):

Jessica F. Green

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691157580.003.0003

This chapter examines a century of multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs) for acts of delegation to international organizations and to private actors. Theories of delegation suggest looking to the state as the likely engine of private authority. With more governing to do, states are enlisting others to help them through the delegation of authority. Drawing on a random sample of 152 multilateral environmental treaties, sampled from all extant multilateral treaties from 1857 to 2002, the chapter asks how often states delegate to private actors, and for what tasks. It shows that delegated authority in MEAs is indeed on the rise but not as a percentage of total governance activities. Instead, there is an overall increase in the amount of governance by both public and private actors. The data also show that states prefer to delegate specific policy functions: monitoring and implementation.

Keywords:   multilateral environmental agreements, delegation, international organizations, private actors, private authority, states, delegated authority, governance, monitoring, implementation

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