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The Age of GarveyHow a Jamaican Activist Created a Mass Movement and Changed Global Black Politics$
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Adam Ewing

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691157795

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691157795.001.0001

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The Visible Horizon

The Visible Horizon

Chapter:
(p.186) Chapter Seven The Visible Horizon
Source:
The Age of Garvey
Author(s):

Adam Ewing

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691157795.003.0008

This chapter examines the efforts of a cadre of clerks, ministers, traders, and workers in the central African colonies of Nyasaland (Malawi) and Northern Rhodesia to nurture the Garveyite movement behind a guise of cautious reformism and under the watchful eyes of the state. This group founded “Native Welfare Associations” and independent churches, ostensibly apolitical vessels through which to assist the colonial governments in their project of African “civilization” and “uplift.” Behind this mask of patriotic accommodationism they communicated with the UNIA and the Industrial and Commercial Workers' Union (ICU), distributed their literature, and filtered news of anticolonial politics throughout the region. By participating in the silent work of organization, they joined Garveyites across the continent in exploring the limits of—and opportunities for—African political expression during the dark years of the interwar period.

Keywords:   Nyasaland, Northern Rhodesia, Native Welfare Associations, independent church, anticolonialism, African political expression

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