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Grimm LegaciesThe Magic Spell of the Grimms' Folk and Fairy Tales$
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Jack Zipes

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691160580

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691160580.001.0001

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A Curious Legacy: Ernst Bloch’s Enlightened View of the Fairy Tale and Utopian Longing, or Why the Grimms’ Tales Will Always Be Relevant

A Curious Legacy: Ernst Bloch’s Enlightened View of the Fairy Tale and Utopian Longing, or Why the Grimms’ Tales Will Always Be Relevant

Chapter:
(p.187) Epilogue A Curious Legacy: Ernst Bloch’s Enlightened View of the Fairy Tale and Utopian Longing, or Why the Grimms’ Tales Will Always Be Relevant
Source:
Grimm Legacies
Author(s):

Jack Zipes

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691160580.003.0008

This concluding chapter examines the explorations of Ernst Bloch (1885–1977), the great philosopher of hope, and Theodor Adorno (1903–69), the foremost critical thinker of the Frankfurt School, concerning the profound ramifications of the fairy tale. In doing so they made a significant contribution to the Grimms' cultural legacy. The chapter reveals that, not long after Bloch escaped the dystopian realm of East Germany in 1961, he held a radio discussion with Adorno about the contradictions of utopian longing. Both displayed an unusual interest in fairy tales and were very familiar with the Grimms' tales, which they considered to be utopian.

Keywords:   utopia, dystopia, Ernst Bloch, Theodor Adorno, Grimm legacy, cultural legacy, fairy tales

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