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Wandering GreeksThe Ancient Greek Diaspora from the Age of Homer to the Death of Alexander the Great$
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Robert Garland

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780691161051

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691161051.001.0001

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The Deportee

The Deportee

Chapter:
(p.78) 5 The Deportee
Source:
Wandering Greeks
Author(s):

Robert Garland

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691161051.003.0005

This chapter focuses on deportation. Deportation in the archaic and classical Greek world commonly took the form of the forced removal either of a large group by their political opponents or of the entirety of the population by a foreign enemy or tyrant—a phenomenon not unlike that of ethnic cleansing today. A frequent cause was factional squabbling between supporters of democracy and those of an oligarchic persuasion. Mass deportation, albeit cruel and inhuman, functioned as a valuable safety valve in that it relieved political pressure. Ultimately, deportation is a severe test of endurance, both physical and psychological, aggravated by the fact that in many cases the deportees are forced to leave all their possessions behind them.

Keywords:   deportation, political opponents, tyranny, ethnic cleansing, democracy, oligarch persuasion, mass deportation, political pressure, deportees

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