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Homeric Effects in Vergil's Narrative$
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Alessandro Barchiesi

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780691161815

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691161815.001.0001

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The Death of Turnus

The Death of Turnus

Genre Model and Example Model

Chapter:
(p.69) Chapter 4 The Death of Turnus
Source:
Homeric Effects in Vergil's Narrative
Author(s):

Alessandro Barchiesi

, Ilaria Marchesi, Matt Fox
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691161815.003.0004

This chapter analyzes how the Homeric model—that is, the way in which Vergil receives and actively models the text of the Homeric poems—does not exercise just one, unified sort of intertextual function. As the previous chapters have shown, analyzing individual narrative sequences entailed reckoning with a plurality of models. The composition of a text is a process, and once carried out, it also creates a kind of thickness: a stratification of cultural codes made up of a multiplicity of models. These models are regarded as presuppositions common to the poet and the implied audience. The narrative text employs the strategy of eliciting these assumptions as mutually cooperating implications.

Keywords:   Homeric model, Turnus, death, genre model, example model, multiple models, Homeric poems

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