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American InsecurityWhy Our Economic Fears Lead to Political Inaction$
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Adam Seth Levine

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780691162966

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691162966.001.0001

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Why Rhetoric about Economic Insecurity Can Be Self-Undermining

Why Rhetoric about Economic Insecurity Can Be Self-Undermining

Chapter:
(p.107) 4 Why Rhetoric about Economic Insecurity Can Be Self-Undermining
Source:
American Insecurity
Author(s):

Adam Seth Levine

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691162966.003.0004

This chapter presents a theory about how people decide to spend money or time on something. It shows the link between being reminded of a personal financial constraint and actual behavior requires stating a theory about how people decide to spend money or time on something. The starting assumption is that there are a significant number of people who find economic insecurity issues to be important political issues. Another starting assumption is that decisions to donate time and money to politics typically do not arise spontaneously but instead upon receipt of a request. With these two assumptions in place, the chapter considers how people decide whether they can spend scarce resources of money or time on politics. It draws upon seminal work in behavioral economics and consumer psychology. Given that this work was originally developed and tested in terms of monetary expenditures, it begins by discussing only monetary donations and later expands this to consider how decisions to spend time are both similar and different.

Keywords:   personal finance, spending money, economic insecurity, political participation, behavioral economics, consumer psychology

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