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The Political MachineAssembling Sovereignty in the Bronze Age Caucasus$
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Adam T. Smith

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780691163239

Published to Princeton Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.23943/princeton/9780691163239.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.186) Conclusion
Source:
The Political Machine
Author(s):

Adam T. Smith

Publisher:
Princeton University Press
DOI:10.23943/princeton/9780691163239.003.0007

This concluding chapter returns to the overarching question that opened the Introduction—how do objects shape our political lives?—by drawing insights gained from the Bronze Age Caucasus into a wider reflection on the political work of things in contemporary moments of revolution and reproduction. It discusses the events leading up to Tunisia's Jasmine Revolution and its aftermath; the Soviet Union's commemoration in 1968 of the founding of the Urartian fortress at Erebuni, on the outskirts of Yerevan, Armenia, which inaugurated a new archaeologically derived assemblage that transformed the material fabric of Yerevan; and a fairy tale written by Armenian poet Hovannes Toumanyan about Brother Axe.

Keywords:   Bronze Age Caucasus, Jasmine Revolution, Tunisia, Yerevan, Erebuni, Armenia, Hovannes Toumanyan, Brother Axe

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